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RAIL Magizine issue 20 cover

RAIL Magazine, Connecting Communities by Moving People, is a quarterly publication produced by the Community Transportation Association of America. In its pages, we chronicle the resurgence and revitalization of the passenger rail in all its forms - intercity, commuter, subways and metros, light rail, streetcars and trolleys, and more - across North America. We focus on how communities of all sizes build innovative, cost-efficient and successful rail operations to better mobilize people. The stories of these vital rail systems are told not only in the kind of equipment they operate or the stations that they build, but the equally important elements of community partnerships, intermodalism, land-use and development, investment strategies, and other aspects that are essential to vital passenger rail networks.

Each edition of RAIL offers thoughtful commentary from leaders in the passenger rail industry, news updates on rail projects across the continent, in-depth features chronicling the best in passenger rail, and helpful reviews of rail equipment, books and media, and more, all of which convey the history and direction of contemporary passenger rail.

 

Click on a title for a PDF of the article.

  • SEKURFLO: Building a Rail Security Network (PDF) (280 KB)
    In late 2006, RAIL Magazine published its special edition (#16) on Passenger Rail Security, which included a number of recommendations. This article highlights the industry's initial response of applying technology and software to the challenge.
  • ORX: Continuing a Family Tradition (PDF) (237 KB)
    RAIL Magazine looks at the ORX Railway Corporation in Tipton, Pa., and its state-of-the-art plant where passenger rail wheelsets, axles and trucks of all sizes and for all manner of rail systems around the country are built and rebuilt.
  • Making Progress: The MPXpress (PDF) (440 KB)
    Since 1989, no fewer than 11 new commuter rail systems have been launched around the United States and Canada, bringing service to 160 stations over nearly 1,000 miles of track. This rapid proliferation of commuter rail in North America would not have been possible without several crucial components, including the engines and railcars needed to move hundreds of thousands of riders each day.
  • Revisioning the American Streetcar (PDF) (245 KB)
    The backbone of the nation's streetcar system that moved millions of Americans in large cities and small towns alike in the first half of the 20th Century were sturdy, workhorse cars. But by 1970, there were no streetcar manufacturers left in the U.S. Today, just as streetcar operations and systems have found new life and support in the modern passenger rail renaissance, so have the cars that make the service possible.

Subscribe to RAIL

Are you interested in RAIL Magazine? Why not subscribe? For only $25 a year you can get thoughtful commentary from leaders in the passenger rail industry, news updates on rail projects across the continent, in-depth features chronicling the best in passenger rail, and helpful reviews of rail equipment, books and media, and more, all of which convey the history and direction of contemporary passenger rail.

Contact

Scott Bogren
Editor
800.891.0590 x704
202.247.1921


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